May 11, 1934: Paul Dean emerges with extra-inning win over Carl Hubbell and the defending world champion Giants

Two months after signing his first major-league contract with the St. Louis Cardinals, Paul Dean’s burgeoning career was at a crossroads. His big brother, Dizzy Dean, had taken it upon himself to serve as Paul’s spokesperson, telling anyone who would listen that his little brother was an even better pitcher than he was, and predictingContinue reading “May 11, 1934: Paul Dean emerges with extra-inning win over Carl Hubbell and the defending world champion Giants”

May 5, 1935: Dizzy Dean faces Babe Ruth

In many ways, the 1934 season marked the passing of a torch. Babe Ruth, the premier slugger of his era, played his final season with the New York Yankees. As Ruth’s career was winding down, young Dizzy Dean vaulted to the national spotlight. As the Oklahoma farmboy led the Gashouse Gang to the World SeriesContinue reading “May 5, 1935: Dizzy Dean faces Babe Ruth”

What I’m Reading: “Dizzy and the Gashouse Gang” by Doug Feldmann

Doug Feldmann has become one of my favorite sources for well-researched books about the most fascinating teams in Cardinals history, so it’s no surprise that I enjoyed his 2000 book, Dizzy and the Gashouse Gang, about the 1934 St. Louis Cardinals. This particular team provides plenty of fodder for a writer like Feldmann, and heContinue reading “What I’m Reading: “Dizzy and the Gashouse Gang” by Doug Feldmann”

May 5, 1933: Pepper Martin hits for the cycle in 5-3 win vs. the Phillies

On May 5, 1933, Pepper Martin, “the wild horse of the Osage” himself, ran wild on Frank Pearce and the Philadelphia Phillies. Batting leadoff, Martin singled, doubled, tripled, and homered while scoring four times in a 5-3 St. Louis win. Martin’s assault on Phillies pitching even surpassed the swings of two female fans who struckContinue reading “May 5, 1933: Pepper Martin hits for the cycle in 5-3 win vs. the Phillies”

September 28, 1930: Dizzy Dean makes his major-league debut

With the National League championship wrapped up and a berth to the World Series guaranteed, the St. Louis Cardinals used their regular-season finale to get their first glimpse of 20-year-old Jay Hanna Dean – more commonly known as Dizzy Dean. One year prior, Dean had been pitching while stationed with the U.S. Army at FortContinue reading “September 28, 1930: Dizzy Dean makes his major-league debut”